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Which area of Spain is it typical?

Autonomous region:
Canary Islands

Canarias


Description

The special climatic characteristics of the island of Fuerteventura have made possible the development of a native breed of goat, the Majorera goat, with whose milk the farmers of the area have made this cheese since ancient times.

It is a cheese with a mild flavour, slightly spicy when it is mature and with a creamy texture and the subtle aroma of the marjoram that these goats graze on. It is cylindrical in shape, with the characteristic impression of the plaited palm leaves with which the mould was traditionally made. The colour of the rind is usually white, although cheeses that are going to be kept for longer are anointed with oil, paprika or roasted maize meal and take on a more brownish shade. Depending on the maturing time, it may be mild (8 to 20 days), medium mature (20 to 60 days) or mature (more than 60 days. The quality of this cheese was recognised when it obtained the Majorero Cheese Designation of Origin in 1996. It was the first Canary Island cheese and the first Spanish goat's cheese to obtain this distinction.

More information

Product information

Type of product:
Others

Season:
All year round

Origin:
This cheese comes from the island of Fuerteventura, in the Canary Islands, specifically from Antigua, Betancuria, La Oliva, Pájara, Puerto del Rosario and Tuineje.

To drink with it:
Young red wines and with sweet wines when eaten as a dessert.

Varieties:
There are different varieties depending on its maturing time and method of preservation, including fresh cheese, semi-hardened, or cheese with roasted maize meal or paprika.

Nutritional information

Energy:
Medio

Cholesterol:
Medio

Comments:
Rich in lipids, proteins and calcium.