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Waterfalls: when water becomes a spectacle



Spain’s unique relief with many mountains and rivers, gives you the chance to see a stunning natural spectacle in the most unusual places: waterfalls. Would you like to see them for yourself? Here we present some of the most amazing waterfalls to be found in Spain.

El Pozo de los Humos, in the province of Salamanca, is part of the Arribes del Duero Nature Reserve. Access is via the village of Pereña, following a road with signs to Mirador del Pozo de los Humos. The route down to the waterfall can be dangerous as the rocks are always wet and slippery.

La Cimbarra is part of the Guarrizas River basin and is located within the Despeñaperros Nature Reserve, in the province of Jaén. Access is via the village of Aldeaquemada, following a drivable track for around 2 kilometres. A few metres away you will find the waterfall viewpoint, offering the best view of this stunning cascade.

The Salto del Nervión Waterfall, on the frontier between the provinces of Álava and Burgos, is within the Sierra de Orduña Protected Nature Area. To get a close-up view of the waterfall you have to follow a dirt track for 3.5 kilometres from the Orduña mountain pass. It leads straight to the Nervión viewpoint, built facing this spectacular waterfall, where the main flow of falling water seems to disintegrate into rising vapour before it reaches the ground.

Aigüespases is located in the Pyrenees Mountains of the province of Huesca, in the Benasque valley nature area, close to the road that leads up to Benasque Hospital. Spring and the beginning of summer are the best times to visit, when melt water from the mountain peaks means maximum water flow.

Also in Huesca, within the Ordesa National Park is the waterfall known as Cola de Caballo (the horse’s tail). Access is on the road between the village of Torla and the Ordesa meadow. Then you have to take the trail towards the Góriz mountain hut. It is around seven kilometres from the meadow and you will need three hours on foot to get to the bottom of this spectacular waterfall, where the water spreads out over a large area as it falls.

Linarejos is in the province of Jaén, within the Sierras de Cazorla, Segura y las Villas Nature Reserve, and it is one of the most spectacular waterfalls anywhere in Andalusia. It is located close to the village of Vadillo-Castril and access is from the jeep-track that heads up to Nava de San Pedro. This route follows the rocky edge of the narrow Cerrada del Utrero Canyon and leads to the waterfall in a little over half an hour. It is best to see it during the rainy part of the year (end of spring or beginning of winter), as it is often dry in summer.

In the Arán Valley (Lleida province), at the end of the road leading to l´Artida de Lin desde Es Bordes, you will be surprised by the sound of the Uelhs deth Joeu Waterfall, where the water spills down over the rocks in an endless succession of small waterfalls. The route covers nine kilometres and is well signposted throughout.

The Mundo River Waterfalls are in the Sierra de Alcaraz Mountains, in the province of Albacete (Region of Castile-La Mancha). Access is via the village of Riópar, heading towards Casa de la Noguera. A path leads off alongside the recreation area, heading to the rocky amphitheatre that is the site of the famous waterfalls.

The province of Cuenca, specifically its rugged mountains, are home to the source of the Cuervo River. Access is easy from the nearby recreation area. It is twelve kilometres from the picturesque village of Tragacete. This waterfall is spectacular, not only for its impressive volume of water, but also for the movement created as the water slips down the mossy rocks like a curtain.

The eastern mountains of the Sierra de Gredos, in the province of Ávila, are home to the stunning waterfall of the Iruelas Gorge, within the Nature Reserve of the same name. It has its origin in the river that flows down the bottom of the valley, in turn a tributary of the Alberche River. Access is easy from the road running between the Cruceras rural tourism centre and the Casillas mountain pass.





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